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3961 Floyd Road
Suite 300-246
Austell, GA 30106
Phone 770-789-7467
Information and specifications on Eagle Coaches
Click on the links below to see the manuals available for that coach

EAGLE 01 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 134 inches
  • Wheelbase: 284 inches
  • Typical Engines:
    • MAN D1548MTH
    • Cummins NRTO
    • DD 8V-71N
  • Typical Transmission: Manual 4 speed
  • Seating 41-46
  • Luggage: 215 cubic feet
  • Aisle width 14 inches
  • Front door width 23 inches
  • Fuel Tank: 130 Gallons
  • Suspension: Torsilastic
  • Typical Steering: Manual

PRODUCTION HISTORY

  • 1956-1957 Golden Eagles, Model Setra-S, by Kassbohrer (Germany)
  • 1958-1959 Silver Eagles, Model Setra-S, by Kassbohrer (Germany)
  • 1960-1961 New Silver Eagle Model 01 by La Brugeoise of Belgium
  • 1962-1968 New Silver Eagle Model 01 by Bus & Car, N.V. of Belgium

     The first Eagles were built in Germany by Kassbohrer during 1956 and 1957 as ordered by Continental Trailways. Built with luxury features, these 51 buses were identified as Golden Eagles. The first Silver Eagles were built in 1958 and 1959 without the Golden Eagle amenities and were selected as the standard bus of the Trailways fleet.
     Eagles built during 1960 and 1961 by Kassbohrer were the first to be identified as Model 01 Eagles. After 1961 Kassbohrer declined to build additional Eagles because of other business and Trailways was forced to find another supplier.
     In 1962 Continental established its own factory in Belgium, with the help of a Belgium partner, La Brugeoise, giving it the name Bus & Car, N.V. The first Bus & Car Eagles were similar to the earlier models except for the introduction of a wraparound mesh grill which remained an Eagle spotting feature until 1969.
     Many U.S. parts were imported for assembly in Belgium, including Detroit Diesel engines and transmissions. Of the many running changes to the Model 01 during its lifetime, most were first seen in the 1964 models. Some were just appearance changes, but others were engineering, such as an air-operated parking brake and new air intakes for the engine. Most appearance features remained the same from 1965 through 1967 except that the silver siding and lightning bolt trim was raised to the window level.
     A large number of internal changes were made in 1968 to create the Model 05.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

Appearances can be deceiving as shown with this Eagle 05 with an Eagle 10 cap.

Eagle 05 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 134 inches
  • Wheelbase: 286 inches
  • Typical Engine: DD 8V71
  • Seating: 42-46 (B&C), 46 (EI)
  • Typical Transmission: Manual 4 speed
  • Luggage: 330 cubic feet
  • Aisle Width: 14 inches
  • Front Door Width: 23 inches
  • Fuel Tank: 130 Gallons
  • Suspension: Torsilastic
  • Typical Steering: Manual

PRODUCTION HISTORY

1968 - 1976 by Bus & Car, NV, Belgium
1974 - 1980 by Eagle International, Inc., Brownsville, Texas

     The first Model 05 Eagles appeared very similar to the Model 01, including the rounded end cap over the windshield, but the defining difference was the reversal in positions of the driving axle with the tag. The main rear axle was placed behind the tag to increase the space for underfloor luggage; this change had the disadvantage of slightly increasing the turn radius. Other visible external differences are a backup light that replaced the center taillamp in the vertical cluster on each side, an amber marker lamp added just above the fourth passenger window from the front, and the change from four baggage compartment doors to three.
     The 1969 Model 05 adopted the new-look appearance generally associated with the Model 05. The angular upper body part, flush marker lamps and squared bumpers remained as Eagle designators until the Model 10 was introduced in 1980. No visible changes were made to the 05 Eagles until 1974 when the lightening bolt was removed from the sides and replaced with silver siding of uniform height from front to rear.
     The last Golden Eagles, a short run of 12 buses, were produced in 1971 as enhanced versions of the Model 05.
     The large Silver Eagle insignia on the coach sides and the raised letters identifying the bus line were changed from raised assemblies to decals in 1975. The last Eagles for the American market were built by Bus & Car in 1976, the same year that Silver Eagle decals were deleted from Brownsville production and the buses were then identified as Eagles, dropping "Silver." The 1976 buses received square turn indicators in each of four positions.
     In 1977, the side-mounted turn signals were eliminated. The front signals were changed to round lenses in the following year.
     The Belgian plant continued to produce Eagles for two years after Brownsville deliveries began, building 20 Model 05s for South Africa, 24 for Australia, and others for Ireland and England, all right-hand drives. During this time, the Belgian plant was sold to MOL, N.V., a Belgian producer of trailers and heavy trucks. MOL retains the Eagle name and emblem for use in the European market.
     All but two of the 1969-1971 Golden Eagles were rebuilt into regular Model 05 Eagles at Brownsville and some Trailways shops during the late 1970s. Some were converted into combination freight/passenger buses, of which about 30 were operating on selected Trailways routes in 1983.
     Late in 1979, some of the Model 10 features began to appear on what were still designated the Model 05. One-piece windows replaced the more complicated windows with the small opening vents at the top which had been on all Eagles up to that time. Roof hatches were installed as emergency exits and the rear window emergency exit was eliminated.
     The last Model 05s, built in 1980, were externally identical to the Model 10 including Model 10 front and rear crowns but had none of the mechanical changes to be introduced on the Model 10.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

Eagle 10 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 136 inches
  • Turn Radius: 45 feet
  • Wheelbase: 286 inches
  • Typical Engine: DDA 6V-92TA
  • Seating: 42-53
  • Typical Transmission: Manual 5 speed
  • Luggage: 330 cubic feet
  • Aisle Width: 14 inches
  • Front Door Width: 23 inches
  • Fuel Tank: 130 Gallons
  • Suspension: Torsilastic
  • Typical Steering: Manual

PRODUCTION HISTORY

Year Quantity
1980 - 1987 2,217

     The most obvious spotting mark of the Model 10 is the sloping front end cap over the windshield, replacing the angular hatch of the Model 05. But this mark can be misleading because many older Model 05s have had the new cap retrofitted. The Model 10 also eliminated the rear windows found on the 05 with a smooth one-piece rear end cap.
     Exclusively on the Model 10 is the new Detroit Diesel 6V-92TA turbo-charged engine, providing better fuel economy and power, which could be identified by the large, single rectangular exhaust pipe and by the air scoop mounted just below the last passenger window on the right until the scoop was dropped from later models. Some customers of the Model 10 have chosen the earlier Detroit Diesel 8V-71 engine which can be spotted from the dual exhaust pipe.
     Another Model 10 feature is a spectacular instrumental panel with aerospace technology and styling.
     Eagles of 1981 and later are identified by the taller driver’s window and passenger entrance door, the tops of which match the top of the windshield.
     In 1982 Trailways opened a second plant to manufacture a new two-axle suburban Model 10 at Harlingen, Texas, creating Trailways Manufacturing, Inc. The original Brownsville, Texas plant remained under Eagle Intrernational. Trailways placed 19 suburbans in Atlantic City service. Although several other operators experimented with the suburbans, the fact that the axle loading exceeded the legal limit in most states inhibited the popularity of this model.
     Underfloor luggage space did not increase when the tag axle was dropped to create the suburban because the space was filled, in most units, with additional air conditioning equipment.
     In 1985, the Model 10 drive train was redesigned to eliminate the mitre box, allowing the engine to be set farther to the rear, improving accessibility for maintenance. The weight shift caused by this change made the two-axle version even less practical so the suburban was discontinued and the Harlingen plant was closed.
     Other special versions produced were the empty shell model for conversion to custom motor homes and right-hand drive models for operation in Australia and other countries.
     The Model 10 remained in production after the 102-inch wide Model 15 was introduced in 1985. Most sales switched to the wider Model 15 but some demand remained for the Model 10 to be used in East Coast tight spots such as New York’s Holland Tunnel. The last Model 10 was delivered in November, 1987 as future orders for a 96-inch Eagle were to be filled with the new Model 20.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

Eagle 15 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 102 inches
  • Height: 137 inches
  • Turn Radius: 45 feet
  • Wheelbase: 286 inches
  • Typical Engines: DDA 6V-92TA (Standard) - DDA 8V-92TA
  • Seating: 43-53
  • Typical Transmission: Allison 740
  • Luggage: 340 cubic feet
  • Aisle Width: 14 inches
  • Front Door Width: 23 inches
  • Fuel Tank: 130 Gallons
  • Suspension: Torsilastic
  • Typical Steering: Manual

PRODUCTION HISTORY

1985-

     The first production 102-inch Eagle for general sales was introduced at the ABA meeting in Reno in October, 1985. Advertised as the Golden Eagle II, it has become known as the Model 15.
     The Model 15 is identified by its higher windshield and redesigned front cap with a one-piece skyview window. The side windows are larger than on the Model 10 and the first right-hand and left-hand windows from the front were made square for interchangeability. Rectangular headlights replaced the round headlights of the Model 10.
     In 1986 changes were made to the destination sign and the outside mirrors in response to operator requests.
     Because of the popularity of the Model 15 as a shell for custom motorhomes and entertainer dressing rooms, a new version with a taller roof was introduced in 1987, permitting a completely level floor from front to back.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

Eagle 20 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 137 inches
  • Wheelbase: 286 inches
  • Turn Radius: 45 feet
  • Engine: DDA 6V92TA
  • Transmission: Automatic
  • Luggage: 345 cubic feet
  • Seating: 43-53
  • Fuel Tank: 154 Gallons
  • Suspension: Torsilastic
  • Steering: Power

PRODUCTION HISTORY

1987-

     Although the 102-inch Model 15 accounted for most Eagle sales, some demand continued for narrower coaches so the Model 10 was restyled to look like the Model 15 and identified as the Model 20. The first Model 20 Eagles were built in December, 1987. Because of the narrower engine compartment, the Model 20 was offered only with the 6V engine.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988