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Information and specifications on GMC Coaches
Click on the links below to see the manuals available for that coach
H8H649

The GMC H8H649 was a continuation of the GMC P8M4905A and comparison of the manuals has shown no difference between the coaches.
233 of these coaches were built in 1979-1980

2708

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2903

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2904

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3101

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3102

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3206

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3207 (See also 3610)

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3209

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3301

GMC 29-foot "New-Look"

Specifications

  • Length: 29 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 162 inches
  • Turn radius: 33 feet
  • Typical engines: GM 478 Toro-Flow II (diesel),
                           GM 351 V6 (gasoline)
  • Seating: 33
  • Luggage: None
  • Aisle Width: 20 inches
  • Front door width: 30 inches
Production history
Year Model
Qty
1969-1971 TDH-3301, -3301A,
TGH-3301
287
1972-1974 TDH-3302N, -3302A
223
Total
510
Note:
Only 13 gasoline-powered buses were built.

     These "baby" new-looks replaced the TDH and TGH-3502 models in 1969. They were an attempt to carry over the familiar new-look styling for sale to transit operators not requiring large buses but proved to be the least successful of GM's new-look line.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

PD 3302

The PD-3302 was built in 1945. It is 33' long and 96" wide, with a wheelbase of 212". It is powered by a 4-71 Detroit Diesel. It seats 33 and has both inside luggage rags and under-floor storage bays. It was made by the Pontiac division at the end of WWII under "office of defense transportation'' or ODT rules. Thus, it is different than most other GMC buses in that the engine is mounted straight-in and the body has some steel. Most GMC buses have a transverse engine and all-aluminum bodies. There were 100 PD-3302's built; the one shown
(PD-3302-016) belongs to the Pacific Bus Museum (www.pacbus.org) and is the only one known to exist.

3501

More information coming

3502

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3607

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3608

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3609

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3610 (see also 3207)

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3612

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3701

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PDA/PGA 3702

More information coming

3703

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3704

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3714

GMC "Old-Look"

Specifications

  • Length: 35, 40 feet
  • Width: 95, 102
  • Height: 113 inches
  • Wheelbase: 239, 282 inches
  • Typical engine: DDA 6-71
  • Seating: 45 or 51
  • Luggage: None
  • Aisle Width: 20 inches
  • Front door width: 26 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1940-1968
38,091

     After being replaced in 1959 by the modern buses which became known as new-looks, these wartime and postwar models became the
"old-looks." This basic design was produced in a large variety of models of various sizes and window configurations.
     The model identification system which GM used with these buses conveyed basic information about the vehicle. For example, a TD-4502 was a Transit bus, Diesel engine, 45-passenger, second model of that size. There was also the TG for Transit Gas and the PG or PD for Parlor car Gas or Diesel. (Intercity buses were known as parlor cars at that time.) As hydraulic transmissions became a popular option in 1948, a third letter, M or H, was added to the model number to indicate either Manual or Hydraulic. Thus the model numbers of the most popular GM transit bus began with the letters TDH.
     The Yellow Coach name was retired in 1943 as GM divisions were revised during the wartime haitus in bus production. When production of buses resumed in February 1944, the buses were identified with GM nameplates.
     The old-looks came with many variations in length and width. The initial models available in 1940 were 28, 30, 31 and 35 feet in length and 96 inches wide. In later years, the maximum dimensions increased to 40 feet in length and 102 inches wide. One exception was an order of 100 for Chicago Motor Coach which, at 41-1/2 feet, were the longest GM
old-looks produced.
     The first buses produced had vertical windshields which were found to reflect interior lights into the driver's eyes at night. After December 1940, all buses were produced with windshields that slanted inward at a 24-degree angle, eliminating the nighttime reflections.
     An optional Thermo-Matic heating and ventilating system was introduced in November, 1946 adding a raised air scoop just above the destination sign.
     The windows of the original design had square frames with a uniform distance between each window. Standee windows were optional. The paired window design, with rounded corners on each pair, appeared in 1948. Suburban models had a different pattern created by joining the regular and standee windows to produce a single, high window, also in the paired style.
     All the existing old-look models were discontinued in 1959 when the startling, modern new-looks with the "fishbowl" windshields were introduced. Production of new size small buses, models TDH and
TGH-3501 and -3502, with old-look styling continued for nearly ten years after introduction of the new-looks because their simpler suspension systems and mature engineering made them cost-effective for many small transit lines still attempting to operate at a profit. Minor improvements were made such as incorporation of quad headlights. They were replaced in GM's catalog by 33-passenger new-looks in 1969.
     The grand total of all styles of GM old-look buses produced from 1940 through 1968, according to GM historian Thomas C. VanDegrift, is 38,091.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

SOME GM "OLD-LOOK" COACHES
Model
Pass.
Engine
Type
Trans.
Wheelbase
Width
Year
Built
3714 (TDH)
37
4-71 Diesel Transit Hydraulic 210-1/2
96
1953
4512 (TDH)
45
6-71 Diesel Transit Hydraulic 238-3/4
96
1953/59
4512 (TDM)
45
6-71 Diesel Transit Mechanical 238-3/4
96
1953/59
4515 (TDH)
45
6-71 Diesel Suburban Hydraulic 238-3/4
96
1953/59
4515 (TDM)
45
6-71 Diesel Suburban Mechanical 238-3/4
96
1953/59
4801 (TDH)
48
6-71 Diesel Transit Hydraulic 279
102
1954/59
4801 (TDM)
48
6-71 Diesel Transit Mechanical 279
102
1953/59
5105 (TDH)
51
6-71 Diesel Transit Hydraulic 281-3/4
102
1953/59
5106 (TDH)
51
6-71 Diesel Transit Hydraulic 281-3/4
96
1953/59
5106 (TDM)
51
6-71 Diesel Transit Mechanical 281-3/4
96
1953/59
5108 (TDH)
51
6-71 Diesel Suburban Hydraulic 281-3/4
96
1953/59
5108 (TDM)
51
6-71 Diesel Suburban Mechanical 281-3/4
96
1954/59
PD3751, PD4151 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 118 inches
  • Wheelbase: 264 inches
  • Typical Engine: DDA 6-71
  • Seating 37, 41
  • Front door width 27 inches
Production history
Year
Model
Quantity
1947-1948
PD-3751
1,643
1948
PD-4151
357

     When Greyhound plans for a revolutionary postwar bus design did not materialize, 2,000 buses of the familiar prewar Silversides pattern were ordered from General Motors and delivered in 1947 and 1948 to replace older buses exhausted by World War II.
The classic Silversides, known for the aluminum fluted siding, formed the first large fleet of diesel-powered buses. They incorporated some mechanical improvements over the prewar buses but were quite similar in appearance. Following automotive design of the times, the Silversides had the gear shift mounted on the steering column. The majority were the 37-passenger model PD-3751 of which 1,643 were produced and the remainder were the 41-passenger PD-4151 of which there were 357. All were delivered to Greyhound companies or affiliates.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4008

More information coming

4010

More information coming

4101 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Wheelbase: 247 inches
  • Typical Engine: DDA 6-71
  • Seating 41, 45
  • Aisle width 15 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1948-1950
335

     When operators other than Greyhound showed interest in 41-passenger diesels after the war, GM responded with its model PDA-4101. Mechanically similar to the PD-3751 and -4151, its styling set it apart from the models built for Greyhound. Some of the 335 built had 45 non-reclining seats instead of the customary 41 recliners. The distinctive drumhead rear-end styling emulated the railroad observation cars of the time.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4102 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Wheelbase: 247 inches
  • Typical Engine: DDA 6-71
  • Seating 37, 41
Production history
Year
Quantity
1950
116

     GM created the model PD-4102 by restyling its 41-passenger bus in 1950 using a distinctive new front end with the destination sign below the windshield but retaining the rear end of the PDA-4101. Only 116 were built.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4103 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Wheelbase: 247 inches
  • Typical Engine: DDA 6-71
  • Seating 37, 41
Production history
Year
Quantity
1951-1953
1,501

     GM created the model PD-4102 by restyling its 41-passenger bus in 1950 using a distinctive new front end with the destination sign below the windshield but retaining the rear end of the PDA-4101. Only 116 were built.
     In 1951 GM finished the restyling by updating the rear end and changing the model number to PD-4103. Production of this bus totaled 1,501 with Greyhound buying a substantial quantity. Many also operated for Trailways and other operators.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4104 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 261 inches
  • Turn radius: 42 feet
  • Typical Engine: Detroit Diesel 6-71
  • Transmission: Manual, 4-speed
  • Fuel Tank: 140 gal.
  • Seating 38, 45
  • Luggage: 187 cu. ft.
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 28 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1953-1960
5,065

     While Greyhound and GM continued to develop a unique parlor bus design which was to become the PD-4501 Scenicruiser, GM constructed a bus incorporating some of its features such as picture windows, air suspension, optional air conditioning and full silversiding. Greyhound bought the first one in the spring of 1953 and eventually operated 1,253 Highway Travelers.
     The PD-4104 was the first of many General Motors buses to use the slanting window pillars, a design theme which remained with the intercity line to its end in 1980 and was also used on all GM new-look transit buses. The PD-4104 became the standard of the industry as 5,065 were produced during eight years. Many were still providing reliable service after 25 to 30 years of operation.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4106 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 261 inches
  • Turn radius: 42 feet
  • Typical Engine: DDA 8V-71
  • Transmission: Manual, 4-speed
  • Fuel Tank: 140 gal.
  • Seating 38, 45
  • Luggage: 205 cu. ft.
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 28 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1961-1965
3,226

     The PD-4104 was restyled with larger windows to create the PD-4106 which was first to use the new Detroit Diesel 8V-71 engine which developed 253 horsepower. It was also the first bus with a combined heating and cooling system with the compressor driven by the engine. Appearance is similar to the PD-4104 but the wider destination sign is an easy distinguishing mark. Greyhound and Trailways operated substantial numbers of the 3,226 produced.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

PD4107, PD4108, P8M4108A SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 132 inches
  • Wheelbase: 260 inches
  • Turn radius: 44 feet
  • Typical Engine: DDA 8V-71
  • Transmission: Manual, 4-speed
  • Fuel Tank: 140 gal.
  • Seating 38-45
  • Luggage: 290 cu. ft.
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 28 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1966-1969
1,267
1970-1971
68
1972-1979
232

     The PD-4107 introduced a higher passenger platform to provide more luggage capacity and the distinctive style informally known as the buffalo bus because of the profile of the humped roof. This basic style was used on all remaining intercity buses built by General motors.
     GM built 1,267 of the PD-4107 including, in 1967, the last buses purchased from GM by Greyhound.
     Minor changes were introduced in 68 model PD-4108 buses manufactured in 1970 and 1971. The P8M-4108A of which 232 were produced, was a 1972 update of the PD-4108 with minor changes.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4501

GMC Suburban "New-Look"

Specifications

  • Length: 35, 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 235, 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 37, 42 feet
  • Typical engines: DDA 6-71, DDA 8V-71
    (40-foot only, 1968 and later)
  • Seating: 41, 45 (35-foot), 49, 53 (40-foot)
  • Luggage: Up to 142 cu. ft.
  • Aisle Width: 15 inches
  • Front door width: 30 inches

Production history

35-foot
Year Model
Qty
1960-1962 SDH-4501, SDM-4501
206
1963-1967 SDH-4502, SDM-4502
215
1968-1971 S6H-4503, -4503A
S6M-4503, -4503A
77
1972-1973 S6H-4504A, S6M-4504A
14
Total
512
Note
Mechanical transmissions totaled 327;
hydraulic transmissions totaled 190
40-foot
Year Model
Qty
1960-1962 SDH-5301, SDM-5301
592
1963-1967 SDH-5302, SDM-5302
1,175
1968-1971 S8H-5303A, S8M-5303A
363
1972-1976 S8H-5304A, S8M-5304A
423
Total
2,553
Note
Mechanical transmissions totaled 2,160;
hydraulic transmissions totaled 393

     Suburban models have no standee windows, no rear door, all forward facing seats on a raised floor, full-length parcel racks and provision for underfloor luggage.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

PD4501 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 134 inches
  • Wheelbase: 261 inches
  • Turn radius: 45 feet
  • Typical Engine: DDA 4-71, rebuilt with one DDA 8V-71
  • Transmission: Manual, 4-speed
  • Fuel Tank: 180 gal.
  • Seating 43
  • Luggage: 344 cu. ft.
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 26 inches
Production history
Year
Quantity
1954-1956
1,001

     The PD-4501 Scenicruiser, the most distinctive parlor bus design of the modern era, was the result of five years of effort based on a design by Raymond Loewy. Originally conceived as a 35-foot bus, Greyhound used a tandem-axle, 40-foot prototype called the GX-2 to successfully lobby for the lifting of restrictions against operation of 40-foot buses.
     The first Scenicruiser rolled out in July, 1954 and was followed by 1,000 more.
     The design was revolutionary in many respects. Seating was on two levels with ten passengers behind the driver on the lower level and 33 above in the rear, over the baggage compartments. Power was provided by two Detroit Diesel 4-71 engines driving through a fluid coupling. This installation proved to be less than successful and the 979 buses remaining were rebuilt with DDA 8V-71 engines and 4-speed manual Spicer transmissions during 1961 and 1962 by the Marmon-Herrington Corporation.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4507

More information coming

4509

More information coming

4510

More information coming

4516

GMC 35-foot "New-Look"

Specifications

  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96, 102
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 235 inches
  • Turn radius: 37 feet
  • Typical engine: DDA 6V-71
  • Seating: 41-45
  • Luggage: None
  • Aisle Width: 20, 26 inches
  • Front door width: 30 inches
Production history
Year Model
Qty
1959-1962 TDH-4516, -4517;
TDM-4517
1,954
1963-1967 TDH-4518, -4519;
TDM-4519
2,091
1968-1971 T6H-4521, -4521A
1,197
1972-1977 T6H-4523N, -4523A
2,562
Total
7,804
Notes:
1. Wide units, TDH-4616 and 4518,totaled 273
2. Mechanical, 4-speed transmissions,
TDM-4517 and -4519, totaled 14

     The new-looks, first delivered in September 1959, were also known as "fishbowls" because of their much larger windows, especially the six-piece windshield, compared with predecessor buses. The fishbowl effect was quite startling to some people accustomed to seeing only small-windowed buses. In Dayton, Ohio, the first order was specially modified to use opaque fiberglass in the lower sections of the windshield to restore proper modesty to the Midwestern city.
     Detail differences in the new-look appearance occurred in late 1962 when the art deco, square marker lights were changed to bullet-shaped lights anf other appearance details were changed along with several engineering improvements.
     Another variation in the model number scheme occurred in 1960 when the new suburban configurations created the SDH and SDM types. When eight-cylinder engines became an option, the D in the model number was replaced by either a 6 or an 8, depending on the number of cylinders. The letters A or N at the end of a model number indicated either Air conditioning or No air conditioning.
     Model designations were by nominal capacity (45) with the even-numbered models (4516, 4518) indicating the 102-inch width. Starting in 1968, model numbers of air conditioned buses ended in "A."
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

4520

More information coming

PD4903, PD4905, P8M4905A, H8H649 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 132 inches
  • Wheelbase: 319 inches
  • Turn radius: 49 feet
  • Typical Engine: DDA 8V-71
  • Transmission: Manual, 4-speed
  • Seating up to 53
  • Luggage: 290 cu. ft. (3-axle)
                 403 cu. ft. (2-axle)
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 25 inches
Production history
Year
Model
Quantity
1968-1969
PD-4903
401
1970-1971 PD-4905
331
1972-1978 P8M-4905A
2,027
1979-1980 H8H-649
233
     The PD-4903 was the first 40-foot GM bus available to non-Greyhound operators. (Greyhound had an exclusive 40-foot design, the PD4501 Scenicruiser.)
     The next version, the PD-4905 generated only 331 sales. The P8M-4905A introduced an optional fully-retractable third axle; 2,027 were sold in seven years of production. The GMC H8H649 was a continuation of the GMC P8M4905A and comparison of the manuals has shown no difference between the coaches.
      
GM discontinued production of intercity buses in 1980, having produced only an average of 230 buses annually since 1975. GM's intercity coach line began to decline in the mid-1960s as Greyhound and Trailways began building their own buses. Furthering the decline of GMs intercity market, many smaller carriers began buying their buses from Greyhound's subsidiary Motor Coach Industries or Trailways' Eagle Manufacturing.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988
4905

More information coming

5103

More information coming

5104

More information coming

5107

More information coming

5301

GMC 40-foot "New-Look"
Also See GMC Suburban "New-Look"

Specifications

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96, 102
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 42 feet
  • Typical engine: DDA 6V-71, DDA 8V-71
  • Seating: 49-53
  • Luggage: None
  • Aisle Width: 20, 26 inches
  • Front door width: 30 inches
Production history
Year Model
Qty
1959-1963 TDH-5301, -5302;
TDM-5301, -5302
4,618
1963-1967 TDH-5303, -5304;
TDM-5303, -5304
8,389
1968-1971 T6H-5305, -5305A;
T6H-5306, -5306A
T6M-5305A, -5306, 5306A
T8H-5305, -5305A;
T8H-5306, -5306A
3,350
1972-1977 T6H-5307N, -5307A;
T6H-5308N, 5308A
T8H-5307N, -5307A;
T8H-5308N, -5308A
T6H-5309A, -5310A
5,677
Total
22,034
Notes:
1. Narrow units, TDH/M-5302, TDH/M-5304, T6H/T8H-5306, -5306A, T6H/T8H-5308, -5308A, totaled 5,437
2. Mechanical transmissions, TDM-5301, -5302, -5303,
-5304; T6M-5305A, -5306, -5306A, T8H-5307A, -5308A, totaled 324.
(These T8H series buses had mechanical transmissions in spite of the "H" designation.)

     Model designations indicated nominal capacity (53) with the even-numbered models
(-5302, etc.) being 96-inches wide. Most notes in the section on 35-foot new-looks apply to the 40-foot new-looks.
     Starting in 1968, the Detroit Diesel 8V-71 engine, relected by "8" in the model number, and VS transmission with overdrive were offered as options for high-speed expressway operation.
     Although production of the new-look in the U.S. was discontinued in 1977, GM of Canada continued to produce them at their Ontario plant, changing the letters in the trapezoidal nameplate under the windshield from "GMC" to "GM."
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

RTS 04

The GMC RTS-II coaches were built in four series; 01, 03, 04 and 06.

SERIES - QUANTITY
RTS01 1977 - 1978 428

RTS03

1978 - 1980 3667

RTS04

1980 - 1986 6916

RTS06

1986 - 1987 921

There were a number of different configurations in each of the series and the model numbers designated the following equipment:

T Transit Coach
H 8V71 Engine
W 6V71 Engine
8 40 Foot Length
7 35 Foot Length
2 102 Inch Width
6 96 Inch Width
GMC RTS SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35, 40 feet
  • Width: 96, 102 inches
  • Height: 134 inches
  • Wheelbase: 239, 299 inches
  • Turn radius: 44 feet max.
  • Typical Engines: DDA 6-71, 8V-71 (1977-1980)
                           DDA 6V-92-92TA (1980- )
  • Seating 40, 47
  • Luggage: None
  • Aisle width: 16, 22 inches
  • Front door width: 30 inches

     First designed as an interim bus while the transit community waited for the Transbus, the RTS achieved permanent status when the Transbus project was cancelled in 1979. The first RTS deliveries were 15 to Long Beach (California) Transit in October, 1977.
     Although display name plates inside the buses show the name as
RTS-II, the actual progression of models has been identified by a Series number. The Series 01, ordered by a consortium of transit agencies in California, Texas and Massachusetts, was delivered during 1977 and 1978 and did not fully meet the Department of Transportation specifications for an Advanced Design Bus (ADB).
     The most obvious external identifying feature of the Series 01 is the front bumper which is different from all later models. Some 01 buses have been retrofitted with the new, simpler bumper. The sloping rear could be either a Series 01 or 03, but this feature is often eliminated by retrofit of improved air conditioning. Of several vendors which supplied air conditioning upgrade packages, the Thermo King looks very much like the factory-installed version.
     Beginning in April, 1978, the Series 03 (there was no Series 02) was a fully qualified ADB. Both the 01 and the 03 had a small louvered panel at the rear of the side windows.
     In August 1980, the series 04 RTS was introduced with the air conditioning condenser relocated above the engine, causing the pronounced slope on the rear profile to be replaced by a square-back appearance. The reduction in air conditioner maintenance was so dramatic that many of the original slope-back RTSs have been retrofitted. First production models of the square-back design went to VIA San Antonio (123) and Miami, Florida (260). The 04 introduced a new style rear bumper.
     The Series 06, introduced in 1986, included many technical changes including improved window latches and seals and a beam front axle in place of the independent front suspension.
     The most obvious 06 appearance change is often hidden by large advertising panels along the sides. The exterior fiberglass panel above the rub rail between the front wheel and the exit door or between the front wheel and the rear wheel became one piece without joints. Also, the rub rails on the 06 have exposed attaching holes that are not present on previous series.
     The RTS model numbering began with TH-8201 designating the first Long Beach buses. The "T" indicates "transit" and was intended to distinguish from parlor models which were being planned at that time but were never produced. The "H" indicates the 8V-71 engine and later models use a "W" for the 6V-71 engine. The "8" indicates the bus was assembled from eight five-foot modules, creating a 40-foot bus. A 35-foot bus has a "7" at that spot in the model number. The second numerical digit indicates the width; a "2" stands for 102 inches and a "6" stands for 96 inches. The last two digits indicate the series number. In the spring of 1979, the model numbers were slightly changed by transposing the second and third digits, thus the TH8603 became the T8H603.
     The last RTS built by GM was completed in May 1987, ending 62 years of bus production at Pontiac, Michigan with the delivery of fleet #919 to Kansas City (KCATA). GM had delivered 11,932 RTSs, 7,136 with wheelchair lifts and 4,796 without lifts. The first order to be completed by Greyhound's Transportation Manufacturing Corporation was for New York, using bodies produced at Pontiac and shipped to Roswell, New Mexico.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988