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Information and specifications on MCI Coaches
Click on the links below to see the manuals available for that coach
MCI MC-5

     The Fort Garry Motor Body Company was founded in 1932 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Greyhound Lines affiliates operating in Canada began buying buses from Fort Garry in 1938. In 1940, Fort Garry was renamed Motor Coach Industries. Greyhound continued to buy most of the MCI output and in 1948 bought MCI. Some 588 parlor and sightseeing buses were built between 1937 and 1960.
     MCI originated the MC series buses in 1959. The early models, MC-1 through MC-4, were sold only in Canada and totaled 196. The MC-5 series were among the first buses assembled at Greyhound's assembly plant established at Pembina, North Dakota in 1963. During the production years, the basic MC-5 was updated with A, B, and finally C added to the basic model number. Even after the 40-foot MC-7 was introduced, the MC 5 remained in production as the 35-foot version of the popular MCI series of intercity coaches. Production quantity for the MC-5, MC-5A and MC-5B is 2,255.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 120 inches
  • Wheelbase: 261 inches
  • Turn radius: 46 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71
  • Seating: 39-45
  • Luggage: 212 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches
Production history
Year
Model
Quantity
1963-1964
MC-5/MCC-5
300
1964-1970
MC-5/MCC-5A
1,605
1971-1977
MC-5B
350
Total:
2,255

MC-5A

MC-5B

Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MC-5C SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 35 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 121 inches
  • Wheelbase: 261 inches
  • Turn radius: 45 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71, DDA 6V-71
  • Seating: 39-45
  • Luggage: 202 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches

PRODUCTION HISTORY
1977 – 1980

     The MC-5C featured a modernized front end to match the 40-foot MC-8 which was in simultaneous production.
     In 1979, over 200 special MC-5C buses were built by Greyhound under contract from Aramco in Saudi Arabia. Two versions were built, one with 44 intercity-style seats and one with 41 transit seats and two passenger doors. Modifications made for desert operation included an increase in air conditioning capacity, an oversized engine cooling system, dual air cleaners and an extra roof cover to insulate coach interiors from the action of the sun. These buses have since been returned to the U.S.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MC-6 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 102 inches
  • Height: 144 inches
  • Wheelbase: 282 inches
  • Turn radius: 47 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 12V-71
  • Seating: 43-45
  • Luggage: 425 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 15 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches
PRODUCTION HISTORY
Year
Quantity
1969-1970
100

     The MC-6 was MCI's and Greyhound's first experiment with a 102-inch wide intercity bus. Two prototypes were built in 1967 and production began in 1969 for a total of 100.
     Many states balked in the 1970s at providing operating approval for the buses. Fifteen of the MC-6 buses spent their entire Greyhound careers in Canada. The 85 U.S. MC-6s first operated on the East Coast, but were later sent to California to finish their Greyhound careers on the West Coast. The engines in the California buses were changed to 8V71s and the manual transmissions were changed to Allison automatics in 1977. The 15 Canadian buses retained their 12V71 engines and manual transmissions.
     Greyhound retired them in 1980 and they were sold to independent operators.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MC-7 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 129 inches
  • Wheelbase: 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 46 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71
  • Seating: 43-49
  • Luggage: 325 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches
PRODUCTION HISTORY
Year
Quantity
1968-1973
2,550

     The MC-7, based on the shorter MC-5, was designed to replace Greyhound's Scenicruiser fleet which was averaging nearly 14 years old in 1968. The MC-7 was built concurrently with the experimental MC-6.
     During its production and Greyhound operating period, the MC-7 represented the current state of intercity coach design with three axles, 40-foot length, and a high seat platform, allowing for substantial underfloor luggage space and absence of wheel-well intrusion into the passenger floor The MC-8 and MC-9 which followed in later years did not change this configuration but rather refined some of the details and updated the styling. Some 2,550 MC-7s were delivered over six years of production.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MC-8 SPECIFICATIONS

  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 130 inches
  • Wheelbase: 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 46 feet (Beginning in 1977, 44 feet)
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71
  • Seating: 43-49
  • Luggage: 300 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches
PRODUCTION HISTORY
Year
Quantity
1973-1978
4,475

     The MC-8 was the first model assembled at the new Transportation Manufacturing Corporation (TMC) plant established at Roswell, New Mexico in 1974. TMC became primarily the builder of buses for Greyhound Lines while the Motor Coach Industries plant at Pembina, North Dakota, which began MC-8 production in 1973, continued to assemble buses for other operators.
     The original MC-8 had a slanted (parallelogram) window design with a wide blank panel midway which produced a seat pair on each side of the aisle with practically no window. These seats were always the last to fill up. Late in the production cycle, the window pattern was updated to eliminate the blind seats and provide larger windows to all. This same window pattern was continued in the next model, the MC-9.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MC-9 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96 inches
  • Height: 130 inches
  • Wheelbase: 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 51 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71, DDA 6V-92TA
  • Seating: 43-49
  • Luggage: 300 cubic feet
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches
PRODUCTION HISTORY
Year
Quantity
1979-1987
9,000+

     The structure, engine and driveline were unchanged from the MC-8. Window size was increased and the windshield got taller as the roof-dip over the driver of the MC-8 was eliminated.
     New Jersey Transit had 700 MC-9s built at Pembina, North Dakota for commuter services. The "Jersey Cruisers" have 49 seats, no lavatory, and 6V92TA engines. An easy spotting feature is the special destination sign built into the body similar those on transit buses. The standard MC-9 destination sign is built inside the bus; showing through the upper edge of the right windshield.
     During 1987, New Jersey Transit took delivery of 415 more MC-9s from Pembina. Over 9,000 MC-9s have been built by late 1987.

Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MCI 96, 102A2 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96, 102 inches
  • Height: 133 inches
  • Wheelbase: 310 inches
  • Turn radius: 48 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71, DDA 6V-92TA
  • Seating: 53 maximum
  • Luggage: 340 cu. ft. (96), 362 cu. ft. (102)
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches

     This is the first 40-foot MCI coach to be produced with no tag axle. For proper weight distribution, the drive axle was moved rearward 25 inches from that on the 3-axle version.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988

MCI 96A3, MC 102A3 SPECIFICATIONS
  • Length: 40 feet
  • Width: 96, 102 inches
  • Height: 133 inches
  • Wheelbase: 285 inches
  • Turn radius: 43, 44 feet
  • Typical Engines: DDA 8V-71, DDA 6V-92TA, DDA 8V-92TA
  • Seating: 43-49
  • Luggage: 300 cu. ft. (96), 319 cu. ft. (102)
  • Aisle width: 14 inches
  • Front door width: 24 inches

The 102A3 was the first production 102-inch MCI bus available to all buyers (first delivery in October 1985) and quickly became more popular than the older, 96-inch width. Only the passenger section of the buses was widened; the front assembly with the windshield is still 96-inches wide and the body widens at a 5.5-degree angle alongside the driver.
Information from the Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses - 1988